How Nigerian Lawyer stormed Supreme Court in religious attire, vowing to encourage his kids to do same in school

0
44
A screen grab of Malcolm Omirhobo at the Supreme Court premises in Abuja on Thursday, June 23rd, 2022.

There was a mild drama at the Supreme Court premises in Abuja on Thursday when a human rights activist Malcolm Omirhobo appeared in his lawyer robe complemented with other traditional apparel.  

The human rights lawyer, who said he is a traditionalist, argued that his decision was based on the Supreme Court judgement that ruled in favour of Muslim students wearing their hijab in Lagos schools.

“I am a traditionalist. I have been missing all along until the Supreme Court gave the judgment on Friday that people can now appear in their religious attires of worship in their school and public school for that matter,” he told Channels Television.

“So, in the circumstance, I just interpreted everything and said they have done the right thing by guaranteeing more of our rights under Section 38 of the Constitution that gives Nigerians the freedom of thought, conscience, and religion from that decision that female students can wear hijab because it is the mode of their worship and any attempt to stop them from wearing it amounts to a violation of their fundamental right. I said, ‘It is good!’

“So, I said I need to also be appearing in my religious attire of worship because it is good for man to be with God all the time. This is my mode henceforth.”

Omirhobo said he will encourage others to wear their religious attires to work, expressing gratitude to the Supreme Court for the ruling.

“My children will go to school like this. I will encourage my relations, my friends; those in the army; those in the police; those in the Navy; doctors; lawyers; they will dress in their mode of worship,” the Delta-born added. “I am very grateful to the Supreme Court. I am very happy about this.”

The Supreme Court had last week set aside, the restriction the Lagos state government placed on the use of hijab by female Muslim students in its public primary and secondary schools.

In a split decision of a seven-man panel of Justices, of five to two, the Apex court affirmed the earlier decision of the Lagos Division of Court of Appeal, which nullified a High Court judgement that banned female students from wearing Hijab with their school uniforms.

The court, in its lead majority verdict prepared by Justice Kudirat Kekere-Ekun but read by Justice Tijani Abubakar, dismissed as lacking in merit, an appeal Lagos state government lodged against the Court of Appeal decision.

The Supreme Court said it found no reason to reinstate the October 17, 2014 judgement by Justice Grace Onyeabo of the High Court of Lagos State, which upheld the ban on Hijab.

(With a report by Channels TV)

Leave a Reply